Thoughts of a pretty geeky girl...

Apr 18
ltcamerica:

timemachineyeah:

Forgive the Google Translate but THAT’S THE OFFICIAL SAILOR MOON TWITTER AND THE PRODUCTER ATSUTOSHI UMEZAWA CONFIRMING THAT
THE ON APRIL 27
WE WILL GET THE VOICE CAST OF THE ANIME
AND OFFICIAL ART FOR ALL THE LEAD CHARACTERS

byaaaaaa!!!!!

Omigaaaaaaaaddddd

ltcamerica:

timemachineyeah:

Forgive the Google Translate but THAT’S THE OFFICIAL SAILOR MOON TWITTER AND THE PRODUCTER ATSUTOSHI UMEZAWA CONFIRMING THAT

THE ON APRIL 27

WE WILL GET THE VOICE CAST OF THE ANIME

AND OFFICIAL ART FOR ALL THE LEAD CHARACTERS

byaaaaaa!!!!!

Omigaaaaaaaaddddd

Apr 18

quote "I love women," is not a get out of jail free card. Thicke pulled the same bullshit when he was accused of degrading women in "Blurred Lines": "When we made the song, we had nothing but the most respect for women," he said. How nice of you to say so, Mr. Thicke. Alas, your work shows the opposite to be true. I am fairly certain many of the men who buy sex and consume porn also think they do it because they really, really, love women. NOPE. You love women like I love wine — as something I consume selfishly for my personal benefit and as a product.

Meghan Murphy (No, “female-appreciation” is not the same thing as feminism)

Full article here

(via casocracy)

Mar 21

hikaru-jan:

britishmiraclediet:

leanpox:

Moonlight Legend (ムーンライト伝説) performed for the new anime by Momoiro Clover Z (ももいろクローバーZ)

image

MY REACTION TO THIS WAS NOT GRACEFUL AND INVOLVED COVERING MY MOUTH AND MUFFLED SCREAMING

momoclo <3

[SCREAMING]

Honestly? Not sure if want…

Mar 21
justanotherimpossiblegirl:

runnerjive:

thre3dprint:

Open Source Clothing.

Now I feel it imperative to reblog this, because the project seems to have hit a snag: The video they put up has been taken down because of claims of 3rd-party content, whatever whatever corporate lawyer stuff internet throttling stuff. That makes me think that Bennetton or one of the others whose stores were glimpsed in the background got their hooks in Vimeo.So I thought I’d tell you a yarn about how this thing works: You download the open-source plans for the machine. You build it. You download their open-souce clothing-maker program.You enter the desired measurements into the fields (the ones I remember from the video were arm and neck and chest measurements, so I’m sure they have waist and/or hips too)You print out your sweater, or hat, or scarf, or cardigan, or whatever it was that you selected. It takes an hour to print out the sweater, working off of the two yarn spools that you can see in the bottom right corner of this .gifThat’s it. Custom-fit, custom-color clothing in an hour, for the price of yarn. Can you see why one of the clothing companies targetted in the video might have felt threatened enough to force the video to come down?

Holy. Shit.

justanotherimpossiblegirl:

runnerjive:

thre3dprint:

Open Source Clothing.

Now I feel it imperative to reblog this, because the project seems to have hit a snag: The video they put up has been taken down because of claims of 3rd-party content, whatever whatever corporate lawyer stuff internet throttling stuff. That makes me think that Bennetton or one of the others whose stores were glimpsed in the background got their hooks in Vimeo.
So I thought I’d tell you a yarn about how this thing works:
You download the open-source plans for the machine.
You build it.
You download their open-souce clothing-maker program.
You enter the desired measurements into the fields (the ones I remember from the video were arm and neck and chest measurements, so I’m sure they have waist and/or hips too)
You print out your sweater, or hat, or scarf, or cardigan, or whatever it was that you selected. It takes an hour to print out the sweater, working off of the two yarn spools that you can see in the bottom right corner of this .gif
That’s it. Custom-fit, custom-color clothing in an hour, for the price of yarn. Can you see why one of the clothing companies targetted in the video might have felt threatened enough to force the video to come down?

Holy. Shit.

Mar 21

anirresistiblysexyperson asked: i get what you're trying to say but PLEASE refrain from making overwhelmingly generalized statements about Japanese people, such as "Being a foreigner is the best way to be wholeheartedly accepted by Japanese people" because it's REALLY indicative of your white privilege and still looking at them as "exotic". It also negates racism non-white people have suffered there. A trans Japanese person has also already responded to that post as well.

To clarify, when I speak in generalizations like that, I am speaking to my personal experiences of living in Tokyo, and while living in a foriegn country was, in part, emphasized by my feelings of culture shock, I don’t see the differences in culture as “exotic” so much as just… “Different.”

I know that white foriegners have privilage in Japan too, but it’s a very different sort of privilage than white privilege in the states… There’s not the same history of oppression that goes along with it. All non-Asian foreigners have it to a certain extent… It’s the privilage to speak horrible Japanese and be told that you’re very good at it, and the privilage to be compared to Barbie and Brittney Spears and be put on a pedestal, and the privilage to be rude and get away with it when ignoring Japanese folkways and mores )like eating while walking or talking on the phone on the train…) and in my case, it included being asked if I will put out for cash, but that’s a story for another day. The point is, I was and will always be seen as an “other” and out-group person to them, but that’s OK, because I didn’t need to be Japanese to feel accepted by them.

And again, being a white foriegner made it easier for me to fit in at school and out on the town because /I/ was exotic to pretty much all of the natives I met. My African-Australian and African American friends had some positive and some negative experiences (the negative ones mostly came from insensitive questions about the history of racial tension in the US) but they were more positive than negative to hear them talk of it. In contrast, my room mates who were Vietnamese American and my Taiwanese friends felt alienated living there because their Japanese skills weren’t super great and people assumed that they were Japanese and somehow illiterate or stupid, so they had a harder time of it. But the OP is also white, and I was trying to communicate to her that she, as a white person, could have an experience like mine and feel welcome and accepted without having to change her skin. She has that kind of privilege too, and that’s why it’s hurtful to say the things she said.

I’d like to emphasize, though, that I did my very best to conform to the norms of the culture… not because I wanted to become Japanese, but because I didn’t want to be a nuisance to the people around me, and, of course, because I wanted to learn about the culture I admired through submersion. I spoke Japanese with as good a pronounciation as I could manage and followed the proper protocol of gift giving and compliment receiving… And was told all the time that it was appreciated. That’s the difference between cultural admiration and cultural appropriation, and that’s why I felt I had to speak up.

Regardless, I am not one to police someone’s identity in general. I just stopped and wrote what I did because in the instance we are talking about, it seemed clear to me that what was going on was racist and culturally objectifying to the friends I made in Japan, and since I felt my experience in high school and middle school seemed to mirror the OP’s, I wanted to give her my perspective and ask that she questions the true feelings she is having.

Mar 20

wehidebehindstars:

peachvenom:

periods help you learn how to get blood off of things which is probably why you hear more stories of men caught with murder

image

Mar 20

Anonymous asked: That response was glorious. I really hope she listens to you.

Thanks, anon! Me too.

Mar 20

The Cost of Kale: How Foodie Trends Can Hurt Low-Income Families | Bitch Media →

disabilityhistory:

It’s simple. Whole Foods is starting to market collards as the next kale. When they started marketing kale as a superfood, its price rose 25% (everywhere in the US, not just at Whole Foods stores). By marketing collard greens as the next trendy health food, Whole Foods is making it inaccessible to poor people, including poor African Americans, who have a long history of cooking with collards. 

This is really interesting and I had no idea. I’d hate to see the price of collards go up substantially

:(

Mar 20

the-ink-monster:

Shout out to all the lucky gals that feel nothing when they’re on their periods while I feel like a fully grown dinosaur on a motorbike is trying to pop a wheelie right out of my vagoo.

Mar 20